electrocaïne session #060b – OIL


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Click on the image below to listen to the a-side:

One of the spearheads of French band Troublemakers, Oil blesses this season with not one but two mixes. Read more to find out about this intriguing subject who in his ‘Ashes To Machines‘ project with Jeff Sharel visited 39 countries, worked with hundreds of musicians, had kilometres of music recorded and tons of good vibrations. His ‘Black Notes‘ record is a masterpiece of black narrative, combining politics, conversation, field recordings, spaces, places and faces.

Enjoy these twin gifts: a-side is an electrifying afro mix, while the b-side takes it down a notch to blues and jazz-filled territory. Both, quintessentially infused with the soul of black music.

When and where, how were these mixes recorded?

The first is a recording of my set in Soweto, Johannesburg in 2006, the other one is a mix I did for the radio.

Can you tell us more about this eclectic journey?

The first mix was recorded in front of 2,500 persons. I was the only white person there, and it was definitely one of the best moments of my career as a DJ.

From ‘Doubts & Convictions’ to ‘Black Notes’, what are you planning next?

Well, I have a new solo album coming out in 2014, and quite a lot of EPs and collaborations on the way. We’ll be back with the ‘Ashes to Machines’ project (Me & Jeff Sharel), with a new release on Vekela, Vakula’s label. And if you haven’t heard Magic Malik’s new album on Bee Jazz records, you should check it out. It’s an entirely electronic album, recorded in 4 days.

Tell us about Ashes To Machines, and all those years spent in the African continent.

We spent 4 years with Jeff Sharel, worked with more than 300 musicians in 31 different countries. 7 days in each country, a live show, a DJ set and it was already time to move to the next country…It was a unique experience.

You seem to have a lot of stories to share, what is the most memorable gig you played?

When home, it’s usually some insomniac shit, writing the best lyrics, making the weirdest music, chatting till the morning, playing hoop.

What keeps you going?

The craziest one was in the Blue Club, Tokyo…The crowd would scream at each new record I would play, and fans were trying to grab me inside the DJ cabin. Another one, would be that gig in Soweto.

Which is your favorite instrument to play and why?

I don’t play any instruments, except my computer which I use like an instrument, with the help of Ableton live.

Where did this fascination for black music come from?

It’s quite simple actually. I started buying records since I was 4, and seeing my parents dancing every time made me love it.

Where did this fascination for black music come from?

It’s quite simple actually. I started buying records since I was 4, and seeing my parents dancing every time made me love it.

A record you’ve been looking to find, and one that never leaves your record bag?

I’ve always been on the hunt for some rare records, and that for many years now…But I will not say which ones. A record that never leaves my bag is “Shape your Mind to Die”, by Leon Thomas, out on flying dutchman records.

Your favorite album of the moment?

My forthcoming album, that I’m still working on. Favorite, because that’s the only one I’m listening to…